Stuck at Super Suck - 'Like It's 1982 All Over Again!'

Craig Jarvis

by on

Updated 37d ago

There are so many different narratives coming out from COVID-19. So many situations and stories, with good outcomes and bad. People who have been stuck, with no way to get home, and others who have had miraculous stories of support and empathy on their particular journeys through the pandemic.

Julian Werts is an American surfer who moved to South Africa nearly 20-years-ago. His lockdown 2020 story is a touch different to most, and a perfect example of how sometimes throwing caution to the wind can be the best option when choices are limited. 

Forecast: Super Suck

Introducing your protagonist, Julian.

Introducing your protagonist, Julian.

© 2020 - George Colendich

"They closed the borders, everything got cancelled," he tells MSW. "I got shut-in, and I stayed at Super Suck for four months. Pigdog heaven." Currently cruising around a very uncrowded Bali with no way to get home, we caught up with him to see just what went down. 

When did you leave South Africa and what was the plan?
I left South Africa on January 28. The initial plan was to do a three-month trip. I did one month in Indonesia, in Ubud and Sumbawa, and I then flew to Thailand for three weeks. It was around March 18 when I came back into Indonesia. I had two boat trips lined up. One of them was going to Enggano Island and another one up to the Banyaks. 

Indo Swell chart HERE.

Oh you'll forgive the quality - it's the best that could be done with only a phone in the pocket.

Oh you'll forgive the quality - it's the best that could be done with only a phone in the pocket.

© 2020 - George Colendich

That's quite a schedule.
It was always going to be a slow trip, though. I was going to go to Sumbawa for 10 days. The plan was to go surf Yoyos and maybe get a little Super Suck if I was lucky. That was supposed to last until the end of March. The Enggano trip was for April I was going to hang around in a little warung with Super Suck as my view until the end of March. After that I was going to go on the Enggano boat trip in April.
 
Then, what happened?
They closed the borders, everything got cancelled, I got shut-in, and I stayed at Super Suck for four months. Pigdog heaven.

So sick. So four months of grabbing your rail. Then what?
I came down to Bali and lucked into a little mansion above Padang. It's pretty cool, sickest views. To stay on in the country, I have to get a social visa for six months. I can't get into South Africa until February, according to the government, so I am officially homeless. But it's pretty good right here. And there are girls around. There are a lot more around than there are back home.

© 2020 - George Colendich

In your little warung above Super Suck, you had a balcony with a view and a hammock to chill on. 
I spent four hours every day on that hammock, for 120 days. That's 480 hours of hammock time, I'm proud to say. I had a lot of time to think about things. 

That's a lot of time chilling and an excellent way to destress. Talking of which, did you ever feel stressed about the situation? At one stage the Indonesia cops went quite hard on people during the lockdown.
Yes, there was some stress. There still is quite a bit, as Java seems to be increasing at about 2,000 cases a day. In the beginning, we were told to only go surf, or stay in our accommodations. Then things seemed to loosen up a little 

Do you think you would have made the decision to enter Indo the second time if you knew what was coming? Mainly concerning travel control and the worldwide pandemic situation?
Maybe not, but I'm glad I did. Four months of Super Suck with only 10 guys as opposed to 60-80 surfers in the hood. 

What's it like in Bali? Still as quiet as it was over the lockdown, or are there people moving around again?
Bali is almost back to normal on the Bukit. It's tranquil, but everything is open and really lovely. It's like going into a time warp back to 1982. 

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Here's Super Suck through the lens of Miah Klein.

Here's Super Suck through the lens of Miah Klein.

© 2020 - George Colendich

With a long-haired Gerry Lopez running through a paddy field with a single fin Lightning Bolt under his arm?
Exactly. There's a friendly vibe around though. It's like a big family here at the moment, and everyone knows each other. Accommodations are, for the most part, totally dead. There are usually thousands of people around here at this time of the year. Everybody is just eking a living. The locals are having it quite tough but there does seem to be loads of support. It's super uncrowded in the surf though, and totally mellow vibes in the water every day.

Do you have any regrets about going to Indonesia or about leaving loved ones at the time?
It wasn't really a decision, it was thrust upon me, so I couldn't really have any regrets. Overall I'd say that I lucked out and by chance got stuck in one of the best places on the planet for a surfer to be stuck. The thing is, like this disease, the future is so unknown, so live in the present and soak up every beautiful moment.

© 2020 - George Colendich

What was the worst part of your whole adventure thus far, because it is ongoing?
I guess the worst thing is not knowing when I'll see the people I love again.

Quite a ride so far, and you have until February inside the country. What's next?
Well, we're off to the Mentawai's. There's a South African boat heading up there, and there is no one around. The breaks around the Playground are all empty.

You know that when international travel opens up, so many people are going to go travelling again.
I know. I'll be done by then, and I'll go home just as everyone leaves. 

For Julian's adventures, follow his at-times hilarious Instagram feed on @lordofleisure and check out just how empty it is. Cover shot of Super Suck by Miah Klein from a separate session.